Thoracic and Sleep Group Queensland People caring for how you breathe and sleep

December 13, 2015

ABC radio sleep disorders with Kelly Higgins Devine TSGQ

Filed under: Blog — Mark Russell-Pavier @ 11:27 pm

TSGQ registered nurse and polysomnographic technician, Travis Bell, joined 612 ABC radio presenter Kelly Higgins-Devine to discuss sleep disorders on 2nd February 2015.

If you suffer from a sleep disorder such as insomnia, restless legs or sleep apnoea, follow the link below and listen in. How does a sleep disorder impact on your life, and what do you do for the condition?

Guests:

Travis Bell from the Wesley Sleep Disorders Clinic, Thoracic & Sleep Group
Rosemary Stone.  Sleep psychologist
Joe Soda. President of Sleep Disorders QLD explains sleep apnoea.
Jack Wilcox also form Sleep Disorders QLD explains the cause and treatment Restless Legs


Afternoons with Kelly Higgins-Devine
Sleep Disorders
02 February 2015, 3:57 PM by 612 Afternoon show

http://blogs.abc.net.au/queensland/2015/02/sleep-disorders.html?site=brisbane&program=612_afternoons

 

Popular sleeping aids may increase risk of dementia

Filed under: Blog — Mark Russell-Pavier @ 11:25 pm

Popular non-prescription and prescription medications, including the active ingredient in Benadryl, have been linked to increased risk of developing dementia by a study published in a top-tier medical journal.

According to researchers publishing in JAMA Internal Medicine, the risk is most associated with long-term use of four common meds:

  • Diphenhydramine – an over-the-counter antihistamine used to treat allergies and aid sleep. Benadryl is the most common brand, but this drug is in several brands of allergy and sleep-inducing meds..
  • Chlorpheniramine – an over-the-counter antihistamine used to treat allergies. Oxybutynin – a prescription medication used to control over-active bladder conditions.
  • Doxepin – an older prescription antidepressant (from a class of meds called tricylic antidepressants).

The study followed 3,434 people over the age of 65 for seven years. None of the participants showed signs of dementia at the start of the study period. During the seven years, almost 800 of the participants developed dementia (637 developed Alzheimer’s disease; the rest were afflicted with other forms of dementia). After controlling for a range of other factors, the researchers were able to link heightened risk of dementia to a daily dose of the four medications.

All of the drugs in question are anticholinergics – meaning they block a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine in the nervous system. Common side effects of taking anticholinergics include drowsiness, blurred vision and memory loss. People suffering from Alzheimer’s disease typically have low brain levels of acetylcholine, and previous research has shown a link between taking anticholinergic drugs and increased risk of dementia in older adults.

Lead study author Shelley Gray, director of the geriatric pharmacy program at the University of Washington School of Pharmacy, commented:

“Older adults should be aware that many medications, including some available without a prescription, such as over-the-counter sleep aids, have strong anticholinergic effects. And they should tell their health care providers about all their over-the-counter use.”

While no one should stop taking prescribed medications without consulting their doctor, Gray believes the study results should prompt people to discuss possible alternatives or dose reductions. “Health care providers should regularly review their older patients’ drug regimens, including over-the-counter medications, to look for chances to use fewer anticholinergic medications at lower doses.”

The study showed that people taking at least 10mg per day of doxepin, 4mg per day of diphenhydramine, or 5mg per day of oxybutynin for more than three years were at the highest increased risk of developing dementia.

It’s important to note that this research does not show a conclusive cause-and-effect relationship between taking these medications and developing Alzheimer’s. This is a cohort study, meaning it observed a large group of people over time searching for patterns in their behaviour that correlate with certain medical outcomes. Even though the researchers controlled for other factors, it is impossible to rule out everything else that could contribute to greater risk of developing a disease. The study also can’t tell us if only long-term daily use of the drugs increases dementia risk, or if several short-term periods of taking a large dose might have the same result. What we can say for sure is that the correlation uncovered in this study, in addition to results from previous research, is significant enough to be of concern, particularly for older adults.

Quoting the researchers: “Given the devastating consequences of dementia, informing older adults about this potentially modifiable risk would allow them to choose alternative products and collaborate with their health care professionals to minimize overall anticholinergic use. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings and to understand the underlying mechanisms.”
The study was published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2015/01/29/study-popular-over-the-counter-drugs-may-increase-dementia-risk/

Study of fruit fly brain in a jar reveals mechanics of jet lag

Filed under: Blog — Mark Russell-Pavier @ 11:24 pm

Irvine, Calif., March 9, 2015 — Long the stuff of science fiction, the disembodied “brain in a jar” is providing science fact for UC Irvine researchers, who by studying the whole brains of fruit flies are discovering the inner mechanisms of jet lag.

To do this, Todd C. Holmes, professor of physiology & biophysics in the UCI School of Medicine, and colleagues used imaging technology to make movies of fruit fly brains kept alive for six days in a petri dish. The scientists captured the activity of individual circadian clocks at single-cell resolution with an extremely sensitive low-light camera in order to determine how the circadian clock circuit is “reset” by light.

The study marks the first time researchers have seen in real time how specific neurons in intact circadian neural networks react to light cues that are comparable to rapid travel across time zones, such as flying from Los Angeles to Chicago. Study results appear online in Current Biology.

Most organisms make daily adjustments to their activity and metabolism to synchronize with environmental signals — daylight being the most powerfulcircadian cue. The scientists found that desynchronization of circadian neurons is a key feature of light-induced jet lag and suggest that treatments accelerating this desynchronization before travel may speed recovery afterward.

“Remarkably, our work indicates that the way you feel while jet-lagged exactly reflects what your nervous system is experiencing: a profound loss of synchrony,” Holmes said.

He explained that a single light pulse cues the biological clock of the fruit fly brain to shift two hours ahead of its original schedule through a process the researchers call “phase retuning.” This is characterized by a circadian circuit-wide pattern of brief desynchrony followed by the gradual emergence of a new state of network synchrony.

The scientists propose that temporarily weakening synchronization among neurons governed by circadian patterns allows for more rapid adaptation (an estimated two days) by enabling phase retuning to a new time zone’s cues. Normally, Holmes said, circadian circuit light response – i.e., jet lag recovery – takes place over four days for the time shift tested. A larger time shift, such as the one experienced in flying from Los Angeles to London, would likely require a longer time for recovery.

“That two-day difference is quite a bit if it means you feel great from the beginning of your arrival, say, in Italy,” Holmes noted. “You’re going to feel bad on the plane in any event, so it’s best to get the adjustment over with so you can enjoy your destination. I’m certain this will lead to treatments that’ll have a big impact on our travel practices.”

“These results literally and figuratively bring the inner workings of biological clocks ‘into the light,'” said Logan Roberts, a graduate student researcher in Holmes’ lab and the study’s first author.

“This work illustrates in real time how the network of daily clocks in the brain adjusts to synchronize with the local light cycle,” added Erik Herzog, a circadian biology expert at Washington University in St. Louis who was not involved in the study. “With extraordinary cellular resolution, the researchers show that some cells shift faster than others following a pulse of light. This might become a useful therapy in treating jet lag or the growing problem of ‘social jet lag,’ where people keep different schedules during the week than on the weekends.”

 

Journal Reference:

Logan Roberts, Tanya L. Leise, Takako Noguchi, Alexis M. Galschiodt, Jerry H. Houl, David K. Welsh, Todd C. Holmes. Light Evokes Rapid Circadian Network Oscillator Desynchrony Followed by Gradual Phase Retuning of Synchrony. Current Biology, 2015; DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.01.056

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California – Irvine.  “Study of fruit fly ‘brain in a jar’ reveals mechanics of jet lag.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 March 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150309135140.htm>.

Losing just 30 minutes of sleep per night can affect your metabolism

Filed under: Blog — Mark Russell-Pavier @ 11:22 pm

Think twice the next time you don’t get as much sleep as you need: A new study suggests that missing just 30 minutes of shuteye during weeknights could boost your weight and disrupt your metabolism.

Many people skimp on sleep during the week and try to make up for it on the weekend, wrote study author Shahrad Taheri, a professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in Doha, Qatar. But weekday sleep debt may lead to long-term metabolic disruption, which may promote or exacerbate type 2 diabetes.

“Sleep loss is widespread in modern society, but only in the last decade have we realized its metabolic consequences,” Taheri said in a news release from the Endocrine Society.

“Our findings suggest that avoiding sleep debt could have positive benefits for waistlines and metabolism, and that incorporating sleep into lifestyle interventions for weight loss and diabetes might improve their success,” Taheri added.

The researchers studied 522 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and randomly assigned them to usual care, added exercise, or diet and exercise.

At the study’s start, those who didn’t get enough sleep during the week were 72 percent more likely than those with sufficient sleep to be obese. Six months later, the researchers said they were more likely to be obese and have blood sugar problems.

Just a half hour of missed sleep during weekdays was enough to cause problems, the researchers found.

After a year, for every 30 minutes of weekday sleep debt at baseline, the risk of obesity and insulin resistance — an indicator of diabetes — was increased by 17 percent and 39 percent, respectively, the study found.

The study was scheduled for presentation Thursday at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in San Diego. Studies released at conferences should be considered preliminary until they are published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

Think twice the next time you don’t get as much sleep as you need: A new study suggests that missing just 30 minutes of shuteye during weeknights could boost your weight and disrupt your metabolism.

Many people skimp on sleep during the week and try to make up for it on the weekend, wrote study author Shahrad Taheri, a professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in Doha, Qatar. But weekday sleep debt may lead to long-term metabolic disruption, which may promote or exacerbate type 2 diabetes.

“Sleep loss is widespread in modern society, but only in the last decade have we realized its metabolic consequences,” Taheri said in a news release from the Endocrine Society.

“Our findings suggest that avoiding sleep debt could have positive benefits for waistlines and metabolism, and that incorporating sleep into lifestyle interventions for weight loss and diabetes might improve their success,” Taheri added.

The researchers studied 522 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and randomly assigned them to usual care, added exercise, or diet and exercise.

At the study’s start, those who didn’t get enough sleep during the week were 72 percent more likely than those with sufficient sleep to be obese. Six months later, the researchers said they were more likely to be obese and have blood sugar problems.

Just a half hour of missed sleep during weekdays was enough to cause problems, the researchers found.

After a year, for every 30 minutes of weekday sleep debt at baseline, the risk of obesity and insulin resistance — an indicator of diabetes — was increased by 17 percent and 39 percent, respectively, the study found.

The study was scheduled for presentation Thursday at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in San Diego. Studies released at conferences should be considered preliminary until they are published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

More information

For more about diabetes and obesity, see the Obesity Societyhttp://news.health.com

Night owls face greater risk of developing diabetes than early risers

Filed under: Blog — Mark Russell-Pavier @ 11:20 pm

Night owls are more likely to develop diabetes, metabolic syndrome and sarcopenia than early risers, even when they get the same amount of sleep, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

The study examined the difference between night and morning chronotypes, or a person’s natural sleep-wake cycle. Staying awake later at night is likely to cause sleep loss, poor sleep quality, and eating at inappropriate times, which might eventually lead to metabolic change.

“Regardless of lifestyle, people who stayed up late faced a higher risk of developing health problems like diabetes or reduced muscle mass than those who were early risers,” said one of the study’s authors, Nan Hee Kim, MD, PhD, of Korea University College of Medicine in Ansan, Korea. “This could be caused by night owls’ tendency to have poorer sleep quality and to engage in unhealthy behaviours like smoking, late-night eating and a sedentary lifestyle.”

The study examined sleeping habits and metabolism in 1,620 participants in the population-based cohort Korean Genome Epidemiology Study (KoGES). The study subjects were between the ages of 47 and 59. Participants responded to questionnaires about their sleep-wake cycle, sleep quality and lifestyle habits such as exercising. Researchers took blood samples to assess participants’ metabolic health. In addition, the study subjects underwent DEXA scans to measure total body fat and lean mass, and CT scans to measure abdominal visceral fat.

Based on the questionnaire results, 480 participants were classified as morning chronotypes, and 95 were categorized as evening chronotypes. The remaining participants had a sleep-wake cycle between the two extremes.

Even though the evening chronotypes tended to be younger, they had higher levels of body fat and triglycerides, or fats in the blood, than morning chronotypes. Night owls also were more likely to have sarcopenia, a condition where the body gradually loses muscle mass. Men who were evening chronotypes were more likely have diabetes or sarcopenia than early risers. Among women, night owls tended to have more belly fat and a great risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk facts that raise the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

“Considering many younger people are evening chronotypes, the metabolic risk associated with their circadian preference is an important health issue that needs to be addressed,” Kim said.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Endocrine Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Journal Reference:

  1. Ji Hee Yu, Chang-Ho Yun, Jae Hee Ahn, Sooyeon Suh, Hyun Joo Cho, Seung Ku Lee, Hye Jin Yoo, Ji A Seo, Sin Gon Kim, Kyung Mook Choi, Sei Hyun Baik, Dong Seop Choi, Chol Shin, Nan Hee Kim. Evening Chronotype Is Associated With Metabolic Disorders and Body Composition in Middle-Aged Adults. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2015; jc.2014-3754 DOI: 10.1210/jc.2014-3754

A short daytime nap improves memory 5 fold

Filed under: Blog — Mark Russell-Pavier @ 11:19 pm

A team of neuropsychologists at Saarland University have shown that even a brief sleep can significantly improve retention of learned material in memory

Sara Studte, a graduate biologist specializing in neuropsychology, working with her PhD supervisor Axel Mecklinger and co-researcher Emma Bridger, is examining how power naps influence memory performance. The results are clear: ‘Even a short sleep lasting 45 to 60 minutes produces a five-fold improvement in information retrieval from memory,’ explains Axel Mecklinger.

Strictly speaking, memory performance did not improve in the nap group relative to the levels measured immediately after the learning phase, but they did remain constant. ‘The control group, whose members watched DVDs while the other group slept, performed significantly worse than the nap group when it came to remembering the word pairs. The memory performance of the participants who had a power nap was just as good as it was before sleeping, that is, immediately after completing the learning phase, says Professor Mecklinger.

The researchers were particularly focused on the role of the hippocampus – a region of the brain in which memories are ‘consolidated’ – the process by which previously learned information is transferred into long-term memory storage. ‘We examined a particular type of brain activity, known as “sleep spindles”, that plays an important role in memory consolidation during sleep,’ explains Sara Studte. A sleep spindle is a short burst of rapid oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG). ‘We suspect that certain types of memory content, particularly information that was previously tagged, is preferentially consolidated during this type of brain activity,’ says Mecklinger. Newly learned information is effectively given a label, making it easier to recall that information at some later time. In short, a person’s memory of something is stronger, the greater the number of sleep spindles appearing in the EEG.

In order to exclude the possibility that the participants only recall the learned items due to a feeling of familiarity, the researchers used the following trick: the test subjects were required to learn not only 90 single words, but also 120 word pairs, where the word pairs were essentially meaningless. Axel Mecklinger explains the method: ‘A word pair might, for example, be “milk-taxi”. Familiarity is of no use here when participants try to remember this word pair, because they have never heard this particular word combination before and it is essentially without meaning. They therefore need to access the specific memory of the corresponding episode in the hippocampus.’

The research team draws a clear conclusion from its study: ‘A short nap at the office or in school is enough to significantly improve learning success. Wherever people are in a learning environment, we should think seriously about the positive effects of sleep,’ says Axel Mecklinger. A concentrated period of learning followed by a short relaxing sleep is all that’s needed.

The results have been published in ‘Neurobiology of Learning and Memory‘. The publication can be accessed via: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1074742715000362

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-03/su-np032015.php

Prolonged shortened sleep increases blood pressure at night

Filed under: Blog — Mark Russell-Pavier @ 11:17 pm

People exposed to prolonged periods of shortened sleep have significant increases in blood pressure during nighttime hours, Mayo Clinic researchers report in a small study of eight participants.

Results of the study will be presented March 15 at the American College of Cardiology’s 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego.

In this study, eight healthy, normal weight participants, ages 19 to 36, participated in a 16-day inpatient protocol, consisting of a four-day acclimation period followed by nine days of either sleep restriction (four hours of sleep per night) or normal sleep (nine hours of sleep per night), and three days of recovery. Twenty-four blood pressure monitoring at regular intervals was measured at each study phase.

During the nighttime, in the sleep restriction phase compared to the normal sleep phase, systolic (top number) and diastolic (bottom number) blood pressure averaged 115/64 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) versus 105/57 mm Hg, respectively, researchers found. Furthermore, the expected fall in blood pressure during the night was suppressed when subjects had inadequate sleep. They also found that nighttime heart rate was higher with sleep restriction than in normal sleep.

“We know high blood pressure, particularly during the night, is one of the major risk factors for heart disease, and Americans typically do not get enough sleep,” says lead author Naima Covassin, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic cardiovascular diseases research fellow. “For the first time, we demonstrated that insufficient sleep causes increases in nighttime blood pressure and dampens nocturnal blood pressure dipping by using a controlled study that mimics the sleep loss experienced by many people.”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic.

Mayo Clinic. “Prolonged shortened sleep increases blood pressure at night, researchers find.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 March 2015. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150313130739.htm>.

Sleep walking neurons brains gps never stops working even during sleep

Filed under: Blog — Mark Russell-Pavier @ 11:15 pm

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that navigational brain cells that help sense direction are as electrically active during deep sleep as they are during wake time, and have visual and vestibular cues to guide them. Such information could be useful in treating navigational problems, among the first major symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders.

In a report on their work in mice to be published in the journal Nature Neuroscience online March 2, researchers found that head directionneurons continued to code for the “virtual” direction of their gaze during sleep. In fact, during Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep — a stage known for intense dreaming activity in humans and during which brain electrical activity is virtually indistinguishable from wake — the ‘needle’ of the brain compass in the mice surprisingly moved at the same speed than observed during wake. During slow-wave periods of sleep, it showed a 10-fold acceleration of activity, as if the mice turned their head 10 times faster than during the time they were awake.

“We have long known that the brain is at work during sleep,” says senior study investigator Gyorgy Buzsaki, MD, PhD, the Biggs Professor of Neural Sciences at NYU Langone and its Neuroscience Institute. “But now we know how it is working in one of the seemingly simpler senses — head orientation — or our sense of where we look at in any given space. The direction sense is an essential part of our navigation system, since it can reset our internal compass and maps instantaneously, as, for example, when we emerge from the subway and try to orient ourselves.”

He further adds: “Finding that the activity of head direction neurons shows coordinated patterns during sleep — as if substituting for the gaze shifts in the navigating animal — demonstrates the brain’s efforts to actively explore and coordinate its operations even when it disengages from its interactions with the environment.”

Buzsaki says the results further support his theory that brains in mammals do not passively wait around to receive sensory inputs, but actively pursue them, just like the active sense of head directionality persisted during sleep in the mice.

For the two-year study, researchers videotaped the head movements of mice and recorded the electrical activity in the head-direction regions of the sleeping animals, specifically in the antero-dorsal thalmic nucleus and postsibiculum regions of the brain. These recordings were then compared with similar readings made in the same mice while they were awake and navigating in various environments.

Adrien Peyrache, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow and lead author of the study, further concludes, “The coordinated activity during the majority of sleep likely represents a consolidation of places, events and times, a sort of navigational backup system in the brain, during which the brain stores a map to memory.”

 

Buzsaki says the research team plans to monitor other parts of the mouse brain involved in more complex forms of behaviors to see if similar neural activity patterns are at work. Researchers also plan experiments to test whether head direction and navigation can be electrically controlled and predicted in advance.

 

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NYU Langone Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Journal Reference:

Adrien Peyrache, Marie M Lacroix, Peter C Petersen, György Buzsáki.Internally organized mechanisms of the head direction sense.Nature Neuroscience, 2015; DOI: 10.1038/nn.3968

Depression insomnia are strongest risk factors for frequent nightmares

Filed under: Blog — Mark Russell-Pavier @ 11:12 pm

A new study suggests that symptoms of depression and insomnia are the strongest predictors of having frequent nightmares. Results show that 3.9 percent of participants reported having frequent nightmares during the previous 30 days, including 4.8 percent of women and 2.9 percent of men. Frequent nightmares were reported by 28.4 percent of participants with severe depressive symptoms and 17.1 percent of those with frequent insomnia. Further analysis that adjusted for potential confounders found that the strongest independent risk factors for nightmares were insomnia, exhaustion and the depressive symptom of “negative attitude toward self.”

“Our study shows a clear connection between well-being and nightmares,” said lead author Nils Sandman, a researcher in the Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Turku in Finland. “This is most evident in the connection between nightmares and depression, but also apparent in many other analyses involving nightmares and questions measuring life satisfaction and health.”

Study results are published in the April issue of the journal Sleep.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine reports that nightmares are vivid, realistic and disturbing dreams typically involving threats to survival or security, which often evoke emotions of anxiety, fear or terror. A nightmare disorder may occur when repeated nightmares cause distress or impairment in social or occupational functioning.

The study was a joint effort of the University of Turku and the Finnish National Institute of Health and Welfare. Sandman and the research team analyzed data from two independent cross-sectional surveys of the Finnish general adult population conducted in 2007 and 2012. Participants were 13,922 adults between 25 and 74 years of age. Fifty-three percent were women. The surveys involved a questionnaire that was mailed to the participants and a health examination at the local primary health care center, where the completed questionnaire was returned and checked by a nurse. Occasional nightmares in the past 30 days were reported by more than 45 percent of participants, and 50.6 percent reported no nightmares at all.

Sandman noted that the cross-sectional study did not allow for an examination of causality. However, he suggested that the results do raise intriguing possibilities worth investigating in the future.

“It might be possible that nightmares could function as early indicators of onset of depression and therefore have previously untapped diagnostic value,” he said. “Also, because nightmares, insomnia and depression often appear together, would it be possible to treat all of these problems with an intervention directed solely toward nightmares?”

 

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Journal Reference:

Nils Sandman, Katja Valli, Erkki Kronholm, Antti Revonsuo, Tiina Laatikainen, Tiina Paunio. Nightmares: Risk Factors Among the Finnish General Adult Population. SLEEP, 2015; DOI:10.5665/sleep.4560

Sleep apnea during pregnancy is not good for mother or baby

Filed under: Blog — Mark Russell-Pavier @ 11:10 pm

Sleep apnea, a disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops during sleep, is a potentially serious condition because it deprives the body of oxygen. It becomes an even more serious condition in pregnant women — who can be more prone to it — because the oxygen deprivation may affect the baby. Researchers at the University of Western Ontario in Canada observed that female rats that were regularly deprived of air during their pregnancy had pups that could not handle glucose as well, making their pups more at risk for metabolic disease as adults.

The team, led by John Ciriello, exposed pregnant rats to chronic intermittent hypoxia — bouts of no oxygen — during their pregnancy and observed that the offspring had higher levels of proteins that encourage the liver to release, and not store, glucose. According to the researchers, the data suggest that reoccurring oxygen deprivation, as in sleep apnea, during pregnancy causes long-term changes in the offspring’s liver’s ability to maintain blood glucose level.

The team has been able to follow the effects into adulthood. At 12 weeks old, “the fasted offspring of mothers exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia were hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic,” says Ciriello. Further tests showed that “adult offspring of mothers exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia exhibit poor glucose tolerance,” he continues. “Our findings indicate that these adult offspring have a decreased sensitivity to insulin but have not developed a complete resistance to its signaling effects at this age.”

The group’s recent findings are consistent with a separate study that reported that “rodents overexpressing 11β-HSD1 (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I) — seen in our studies — develop obesity, have elevated circulating corticosteroid levels — also seen in our studies — and develop type 2 diabetes,” Ciriello says.

“This further supports our suggestion that the adult offspring of mothers exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia during gestation are at a higher risk for developing some aspects of the metabolic syndrome, including type 2 diabetes,” says Ciriello.

 

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Physiological Society (APS). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

American Physiological Society (APS). “Sleep apnea during pregnancy is not good for mother or baby.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 March 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150330134411.htm>.

 

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